Dominic

Buddhas by the roadside

Buddhas by the roadside

April 7, 2020
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I don’t know how many times I’ve sat in complete rapture listening to Dominic tell a story, or debunk a book, or guide me through a connection of dot’s that I wasn’t anywhere near connecting. More than once, I’ve wished I were recording it, wanting to share his insights, his wisdom, his deep knowledge of more areas on human existence on Earth than I can name.

Then there’s Caspian. Such a dear friend of mine, popping ideas right and left, and generously inviting me to tag along for the ride. Wise well beyond his years and yet, young enough to introduce new vistas of human existence in my life in a completely different way to how D does it, and never shy of telling me when I am off base in one or another way.

I love them both and love spending time with them. And since the fall of 2019, we’ve been doing just that, recording our conversations. However, we’ve never really gotten around to figuring out how to put this out there, or when… and then: Global pandemic strikes.

And there are no people I would rather sit with, talk with, engage with and receive tankespjärn from, than these two. So, that’s what we’ve been doing. We’ve recorded a number of conversations, which all have the corona-virus as a common denominator, but let me tell you, these conversations take the most wondrous routes, passing through such topics as Process Work, salt and slavery, the economy of Modern Man, Georgism and the Commons, and so much more.

And we said, sod it. Let’s not figure out precisely how to put this out there, let’s just do it. So that’s what we’ve done. The Corona Conversations by Buddhas by the roadside, are available on most pod players (or will be very shortly, I know Anchor and Spotify are up edit: now on Apple/Podcasts, and the rest are soon to follow!), and I would urge you to take a listen. Start with the one from March 14th, 2020, because that’s where we started this. And then – well. It’s up to you. Keep listening, or turn us off, your choice. But at least, give us a listen, at least if you are ready for some serious tankespjärn!

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Critical chain (book 2 of 12)

February 16, 2020
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My guess is this book has been standing unread in my bookshelf for the better part of 12-13 years or so. Possibly even longer, who knows. (Imagine if books could tell their stories? I mean, the individual book: Oh yeah, I remember the day she picked me up at the bookstore and brought me home, I was so thrilled, but honestly, I’ve been feeling extremely neglected for the better part of 1,5 decade…) The book in question is Critical chain by Eliyahu M. Goldratt.

Being involved in a project building a manufacturing site for pharma, the book called out to me when it was time to pick my 12 + 12 books. Had I not had this current project top of mind, it would likely have stayed on the bookshelf for another decade or so.

Reading it, I’ve underlined several passages directly relating to my project managing quandaries du jour, but none of that is especially interesting outside the scope of project management. However, there’s this one passage that directly relates to another one of my current ventures, the most-likely-or-at-least-hopefully-soon-to-be-released-podcast-adventure I am on with Caspian and Dominic.

“Presenting a problem as a conflict between two necessary conditions makes a lot of sense. But I was almost programmed to proceed to find a compromise. In academia we don’t call it compromise, we call it optimize. Three-quarters of my articles are optimization models of some kind. You can imagine how difficult it was for me to accept that a much better solution, or even solutions, emerge by refusing to attempt to find a compromise, and instead concentrating on exposing the underlying assumptions.”

The I of the quote is Johnny Fisher, a professor at a university, in this fictionalized business/project management-skills book. If you’ve read The monk who sold his Ferrari by Robin Sharma, you know the type of book this is. If you haven’t, well, basically it’s a novel teaching a specific project management skill.

Concentrating on exposing the underlying assumptions.

That sentence jumps out at me, almost punching me in the nose with its insistent underlying message. For many years, and many times, I’ve said that assumptions are the mother of all fuck-ups, and so far I’ve yet to be proven wrong. And at the same time, assumptions can be so sly, so cunning, undercover bordering on stealth-like, elusive as a unicorn, because what they point to is my personal truths. And those just are. I don’t question them. I am rarely aware of them, they just are. So how, then, to expose them? Perhaps in different words, but still, that’s one thing we are looking at in the podcast-adventure.


The book I am blogging about is part of the book-reading challenge I’ve set for myself during 2020, to read and blog monthly about 12 Swedish and 12 English books, books that I already own.

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All that I am.

February 28, 2019
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As I am. Intention of the year.
Manifesting in the most astonishing ways, this intention of mine: As I am.

In my conversations with D and D (my friend and soulmate Dominic – who just happens to be the most skilled processwork therapist – and my coach Dave) different aspects of me show up.
Warrior-Helena. Worrier-Helena.
The Sisyphean-like Worker-Helena, constantly pulling a heavy load.
And today I welcomed Sly-Helena onto the stage, in the company of Sharp-Helena.

This is me. As I am.
All of me. All that I am.

Where this all will lead?
Beats me.
But I am sure having fun in the process; the unearthing; the embodying.

Fun? But, there’s a lot of pain and tears, feelings of insecurity, loneliness and shame isn’t there?

Yes.
True.
There is.

But that’s part of the fun, honestly.
Not fun as in me laughing my head off the entire time.
No. Not that type of fun.

Rather the type of fun that has me experience these different aspects of me, feeling the emotions, raw and rough. Discovering, opening new doors within, reacquainting myself with parts of me that haven’t been very prominent recently. For me, this is fun. Exciting. It’s like going on an adventure, not knowing what will happen, who will turn up, where the journey will take me.

The best kind of journey there is, lasting a lifetime at that!

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Picked a card

December 25, 2018
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Picked a Be the change-card. Got Courageousness

It resonates.

Given what is to come, which I’ve started to really know thanks to my new coach, and our (so far) three conversations, courage is a wonderful companion. I have to – want to! – embody courage. Be it. Show it.

Sensing into the card, courageousness is the willingness to be it, with it being anything. To be afraid and still act. To feel ashamed and still speak up. To feel small and not let that feeling stop me from stepping into that which is, always and already.

Always and already, Dominic says. And I love it.
Always and already courageousness is there. Is here.
Am I acting on it? Am I in touch with it? Am I present to it?

FB Live #55 🇬🇧🇺🇸- Picking a cardMore on the #BeTheChangecards here: https://helenaroth.com/be-the-change-cards-and-guidebook/

Publicerat av Helena Roth Måndag 24 december 2018

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