language

I see how others…

I see how others…

March 2, 2020
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I see how others write, and I go Oh, I’d like to be able to write like that.
But then I realize, I write the way I write. And I’ve found a flow in my language that I enjoy and like. So… it’s more a matter of enjoying the writing of others, and possibly be inspired by it.

Doodle from a session on Innovation and ontological design by Karl McFaul and Michael Sillion, at Studio in Malmö, 2018.

I see how others draw, and I go Oh, I’d like to be able to draw like that.
But then I realize, I draw the way I draw. And I’ve found a flow in my doodling (more than anything) that I enjoy and like. So… it’s more a matter of enjoying the drawings of others, and possibly be inspired by it.

I see how others take photographs, and I go Oh, I’d like to be able to take photographs like that.
But then I realize, I take photographs the way I take photographs. And I’ve found a flow in my photography that I enjoy and like. So… it’s more a matter of enjoying the photography of others, and possibly be inspired by it.

I see how others make music, and I go Oh, I’d like to be able to make music like that.
But then I realize, I don’t necessarily make music if by making music I mean to compose. But I make music, in the way that I sing, play the guitar, and dance (isn’t that a way of making music as well?). And I’ve found a flow in how I sing and play and dance that I enjoy and like. So… it’s more a matter of enjoying the music-making of others, and possibly be inspired by it.

I see how others respond to being tagged, or how generously they comment on the posts of others when stumbling upon them, and I go Oh. Why haven’t I thought of that? That’s something I could easily do, myself.
And then I realize, that’s the beauty of a community such as The Creative’s Workshop. I can be inspired by all these wonderful creators, in any way, shape or form that I like, without ever having to belittle myself or beat myself up for not having thought of something first. I can simply bear witness and try things on, see if it’s a fit, see how I can comment more generously, connect more graciously, create more humbly.

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Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View (book 12 of 12)

December 29, 2019
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in Tip
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At long last… I started reading Richard Tarnas’s Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View end of February, and just finished it, completing my Goodreads reading challenge of 2019 (75 books read, this is my 75th) as well as my “12 Swedish and 12 English books to read and blog about” of the year.

Cosmos and Psyche opens doors in the reader’s mind, doors towards the future. Yes, it records, analyzes, and interprets events of the past, but its primary relevance points towards the future. Its thorough research fulfills a function that is central to the genuine, hard-nosed pursuit of human knowledge: ‘the elicitation of disbelief and the celebration of surprise’ (Lewis Thomas). Richard Tarnas dares to be far ahead of conventional thought. He broadens our horizons until we suddenly see with delight vistas and connections we never expected. Here at last is a world view which – in contrast to prevailing ones – has a future.” – David Steindl-Rast

The first half of the book I read with no sense of urgency. The latter… Knowing here’s a book preferably read a chapter at a time, and not one iota more, as it is amongst the densest and rich writings I’ve as yet encountered, and knowing the five-hundred pages had to be read come new years…  Well. Let’s just say, I will be re-reading this book, and I will be mining gold-nuggets and jewels from it that I totally overlooked this first time, of that I am certain. You see, it’s easy to get cheesecaked out when reading Cosmos and Psyche which I think Tarnas (or his editor?) was very much aware of, as the chapters are mostly 8-12 pages long or so; just perfect!

“[One is reminded here of] Niels Bohr’s axiom in quantum physics, ‘The opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth’, or Oscar Wilde’s ‘A Truth in art is that whose contradiction is also true’. What is difficult, of course, is to see both images, both truths, simultaneously: to suppress nothing, to remain open to the paradox, to maintain the tension of opposites. Wisdom, like compassion, often seems to require of us that we hold multiple realities in our consciousness at once.”

Cosmos.
Psyche.

Outer.
Inner.

Without.
Within.

Tarnas gives me tankespjärn to last me a lifetime or two, in the most beautiful language. I am stunned, aha-ed, confused and confounded, at times chocked, now and again in total disbelief and throughout it all, flabbergasted at the amount of meticulous work that has gone into the makings of this work. It’s far from an easy read, one I would never have picked up had it not been for the one and only Mr D (who else…). How lucky I am!

“One is unlikely to discover what one is certain cannot possibly exist.”

Being open – in mind, in heart – is perhaps the single most important insight I take with me, from reading Cosmos and Psyche. With openness, the possibility increases to discover that which does exist, however unaware I am of it.


The book I am blogging about is part of the book-reading challenge I’ve set for myself during 2019, to read and blog about 12 Swedish and 12 English books, one every other week, books that I already own.

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When breath becomes air

February 4, 2017
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in Tip
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When breath becomes airWowed.
By the beauty of the language.
By the vulnerability and gentleness of Paul.
By the hard-earnedness of the insights shared.

A must-read.
A book I know I will be able to read, over and over again, and always find something new in.

The foreword alone, is a magnificent read – by Abraham Verghese, author of another book that wowed me, in much the same way. Similar and yet, different. But the language. The beauty of the language, the skill of using words, of stringing them together, into sentences and paragraphs that move me, shaking me to my core. Brings tears to my eyes, and lets me soar high on the winds of possibility. All at the same time.

In the acceptance, the experience, of death, Paul Kalanithi generously shares with us a gift, that lasts long after his passing. A passing I cannot help feel was premature. So much he could have continued to give, to his loved ones, patients and colleagues, and to the world.

But I had perhaps not heard of him then – and the same might go for many a people. And it becomes apparent to me, as I read, that the focus within, that says this was not fair, he should have lived much longer, isn’t serving me. It retracts from the message of the book, and so I let it go. Stop resisting, and fall into acceptance, as I read, feverishly, page after page, turning them quickly, not wanting to miss a word and at the same time eager for the next page to reveal its beauty to me. And in accepting, the gift of Paul sharing what he learns as he walks into the valley of death, expands my world, with every breath I take. And then…. breath becomes air.

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