Seth Godin

Keep on…

Keep on…

September 21, 2020
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I read:
People don’t show up when you launch.
They show up when they’re ready.

Such a simple concept, and yet… hard to come to terms with.
Or. Rather. Hard to disassociate between me doing my work, and you showing up when –and more importantly!– if my work is for you.

This is what generosity is.
What invitations are.

Me doing my work, putting it out there, telling the world, by all means, but not shoving it down anyone’s throat, not playing dirty. Generously sharing, shipping, showing up. Reaching out a hand, with a personal invitation

(this, for me! My achilles heal. Still. And I need to stop saying that.

Let me rephrase: This has been my achilles heal. But. It. Is. No. More.

Today I exult in sending out personal invites; hammering it home… No. That’s not very generous to me, is it? Putting away my hammer, and instead, giving myself a high five for each personal invite I extend, for each generous act of mine, for all the ways I show up. For me. For you.)

…that truly is an open, honest, no-strings-attached-invitation, where a No is as welcome as a Yes.

And how inviting others into my world, my creations, is, truly, generous, and that there’s no way for me to know when you’re ready, so the best thing I can do is keep on creating, keep on shipping and sharing, keep on inviting.


#tankespjärn, for those who wish to discover. More. Other. New.
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The never-ending story of the questioning mind.

July 5, 2020
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I blog every day.
(Just like Seth.)
Is it too much, though?

Aarrgghhhh.
Resistance speaking? Fear? Not wanting to be too much?
(But I ”am” too much. And quite happily so.)

Who else publishes something daily?
Do you ever fear it’s ”too much to handle” for your audience?
Would you change, if it was?

For me, it’s simply the easiest way to do stuff. Daily.
(The Upholder in me nods and chimes in: I get such a kick out of run streaks as well!)

But I haven’t had a lot of people subscribing to my blog before, and now, more and more are trickling in, which makes me truly happy. And… fearful. For the above-mentioned reason.

Why?
(Oh, I know why, that’s simply the way the mind works. Thoughts come and go, and some of them sort’a makes an imprint, has me dive deep into the rabbit hole…)

Honest to God, I don’t read every post Seth publishes. I get the emails, and read some. Save them, to read later, and when there’s too many, I simply delete them instead. Unread.

So if you (imaginary subscriber of my blog) do the same, that’s perfectly fine.
I hope you read some, of course, but there’s no expectation from me that you read the lot.
Truly.

But should I take that, and turn it into a rational for not writing daily? If I post 3 days a week, would more people read more of the posts then? Or weekly?

Nah.

It doesn’t sit right.

But who knows, perhaps, once day, it might?
Or I’ll simply get fed up with writing/publishing daily, and I’ll start to ponder whether or not I write too seldom…

And on and on it goes.
The never-ending story of the questioning mind.


#tankespjärn, for those who wish to discover. More. Other. New.
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Putting ourselves out there

June 28, 2020
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The Creative’s Workshop has been a truly transformative experience, partaking in something like this, especially during the times we are living in–the workshop started beginning of February 2020, just before COVID-19 and the Coronavirus-pandemic sort of became a reality for us all–feels like a meant-to-be-moment in my life.

As the workshop is coming to an end, many of us are reluctant to let go, a reluctance akin to that which I believe humans feel upon leaving the womb. It’s been nourishing and sheltered and has felt very safe and loving, and yet… outside, that’s where everything learned from within the bubble is to manifest. Because we do live in a world of form, a physical world, putting ourselves out there is of importance. That’s how we seed generosity, that’s how we share of ourselves, our fears and favorites, our mishaps and major wins, our questions, insights and creative outputs.

The very final Open Mic, organized by one of the groups created within the workshop, has a record turn-out, and even though I’ve only understood the beauty of the Open Mic these past 4-5 weeks, participating in them has been one of many highlights of my TCW-exploration.

So I want to share a bit of the glory of TCW with you, the out there-part of the world.

Here’s a new take on Arlette Manassehs limerick, put into visuals by Manu Satsangi:

Timmy Riordan sang the most beautiful song for us: Lean into Me

Laura Tucker of the Free your inner guru-podcast shared a bit of her experience recording an episode with Charles Wilson, which can be found here: Music is Medicine

Jayashree Krishnan, who painted Pop the cat for me, painted a smashing portrait of Seth Godin (who’s the man behind the Akimbo workshops, along with a crew of skilled professionals and coaches!) during the Open Mic, who’s also got a GoFundMe-project for a series of watercolors on care-workers that she’s been sharing within and without TCW. Please check it out, fund it, and share the word!

And then there was Isabel Núñez Cortés sharing a piece of her music, from a scoring competition she’s participating in. My take, listening to the music while watching the video was: But… What? This i s n ‘ t the real score for this video? It sounds just like it’s supposed to! 

I could go on, given the fact that there were 20+ people on the celebratory final OM, but… I won’t. Or. I might… in the future. But not now. I think you’ve already gotten enough to go around for a long time (cuz I am totally counting on y’all to click and view and listen and share and subscribe and fund and seed generosity in any way, shape or form you can!). And I want to make sure everyone listens to Charles Wilson (same one who’s participating in Laura’s podcast) on George Floyd and the Struggle for Equality which he played live as the finale of the OM-finale, and man… that was a m a z i n g to witness:

It’s been an honor to be a part of this workshop as well as these Open Mic-sessions!

❤️   

(But how can I stop here? When I haven’t said a word about Kathy Karn or Jim Grady, not to mention Amandawhom I have mentioned about before though!– or Jennifer or Sue or… 

Someone.
Please.
Make me stop!

But how can I?)

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Testimonials

April 14, 2020
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Testimonials.
What value do they hold? 

It’s much easier for me to listen to a personal account of something (whatever it might be. A new book, series, restaurant, savings scheme or…) by someone I know, and take to something. And if it’s not someone I know, I am slightly less inclined to try whatever out. 

But what goes as best practice these past years, is to gather testimonials. In writing, or on camera. Showcasing them on websites and offers, in commercials and marketing. And I’ve never really thought much of it, until I spoke to C about it. And he said, bluntly:
F*ck em. Couldn’t care less. Don’t want to know, don’t want to read, don’t want to hear. 

Which had me baffled. (And you’ll understand why I love hanging with him since he is so skilled at providing me with tankespjärn!)
Mostly because I had simply never really stopped to consider them. Testimonials. What good are they? Which ones provide value for me? Which ones don’t? And do I honestly receive the value I perceive from them, or am I simply affirming my own biases? 

The latter reminded me of a pod (in Swedish unfortunately) with the professor of marketing and consumer behavior at the Stockholm School of Economics Micael Dahlén. He spoke on biases and grades, TripAdvisor and book reviews and basically said the same thing C did, but with a bit more data to back him up. 

Now… I love receiving constructive feedback from others, on things I’ve done, on courses I’ve given, on workshops I’ve facilitated, and it feels great to have my ego stroked when the feedback if gushingly positive, but is there any use in showcasing that type of feedback? Or are they more of an ego-boost?

I’ve heard and read Seth Godin say, on a number of occasions, to not look at reviews or comments.
I’ve heard and read Brené Brown say, on a number of occasions, to not listen to anybody who isn’t themselves in the arena, to use her phrase. Not the negative expletives. understandably, but not the positive gushings either, because both will skew your view. Neither is of service to you or your craft.

So. What’s the value of a testimonial? Truly?


Tankespjärn, for those who wish to discover. More. Other. New.
Join!

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Winnie-the-Pooh on Management & Problem Solving (book 3 of 12)

March 16, 2020
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I really did not enjoy reading Winnie-the-Pooh on Management & Problem Solving by Roger E. and Stephen D. Allen.

And in a sense… that makes me happy. Oddly enough.
Bear (haha. Pun not intended, would you believe it?) with me, as I try to explain.

You see.
I have a tendency to enjoy most of what I read.
I love books. I read lots.
And I can as easily down a quick-read from the chick-lit genre as a fact-based non-fiction book on leadership and human development, a Science Fantasy-trilogy as a spiritual deep-dive into the world of Mary Magdalen.
And most everything I do enjoy. I find something in them that attracts me, keeps me reading.
Can be the wit of it, the beauty of the language, a totally engrossing story or facts that makes my mind boggle.

“Remember, good judgment is the result of experience, and experience is the result of bad judgment.”

But more and more, I can discern (what a wonderful word that one! Discernment.) what I don’t like, what I don’t enjoy, where the language is not alluring, where I cannot get close to the characters (The Neapolitan Novels of Elena Ferrante is a great example), where something, whatever it might be, just seems off for one reason or another.

I had but read a few pages of this book when I knew it was off. For me! Which is an important caveat, as my taste is just that: mine. Noone elses. I borrowed this book from C, and he swears by it. But if I had not assigned this book a slot in my “read these 12 English books in 2020” I would have closed the book, returned it to C and never thought more of it.

But as I had chosen it, I made myself finish it, even though it took me more or less three months, with it laying on my dressing table as a constant reminder…

Perhaps it’s as simple as me not really being a Winnie-the-Pooh fan?
Perhaps the way the Allen’s emulate the way A.A. Milne writes (and is allowed to use excerpts from his books on Winnie-the-Pooh, both the written stories and the illustrations), but without being as great word-smiths as Milne?
Perhaps it was simply the wrong time for me to read it?

I don’t know, and don’t have to delve into it in-depth, but… at the same time, this is where my happiness comes in. You see, I am currently enrolled in The Creative’s Workshop (workshop run for the first time by Seth Godin on akimbo.com), and in several of the prompts (lessons you might say, three per week, over a 100-day-period) we’ve been asked to look at things such as these:
What is good, in my view? Why is it good? Who crafts good stuff (similar to that which I am working on)?
What don’t I think is good, and why? Who crafts “bad” stuff?
Who do I admire? Who do I want to emulate? And who’s the amateur, the professional and the hack in your line-of-work?

So.
Winnie-the-Pooh is helping me discern my responses to questions like these ones.
And that’s really helpful!

“…creativity […] is a way of being, of looking at things without judging them first, and that it can be learned and improved.”


The book I am blogging about is part of the book-reading challenge I’ve set for myself during 2020, to read and blog monthly about 12 Swedish and 12 English books, books that I already own.

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Hacks, amateurs and pro’s!

February 15, 2020
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The Creative’s Workshop continues, this time with a prompt that had me struggle and shirk away from the full extent of it. Asked to identify a hack, an amateur and a professional within my given creative outlet, I had the following to say:
Hm. So. My creative outlet is, to a large extent, my blogging, the writing process is the thing. So I’d have to look there. I don’t make any money from my blogging, which I guess makes me an amateur. I certainly don’t have a vast and adoring public either, but drip by drip, it’s increasing slow but steady. But who are the glorious amateurs, the successful professionals and the hacks? That prompt sure makes me dig deep. Especially so as I am Swedish, and still want to share people writing in English here, so you might be able to discover someone new.

The glorious amateurs. My friend Anna Brix Thomsen. She’s powerful. She’s brave and courageous. She definitely doesn’t hold back from sharing generously and with huge amounts of vulnerability. And boy does she ever provide #tankespjärn! Her sharing revolves a lot around parenthood, and unschooling/learning, but the underlying theme of it all is self-discovery, I’d say. And anyone who’s a parent knows the amount of inner work that having a kid entices. She’s got a daughter at home and has had less time writing her-style-long-posts, so a lot of the sharing these past years have been done on Facebook and/or Instagram rather than on her blog, but she’s picking up blogging again from what I understand. I hope, and think, that she’s stepping into the professional arena. And I for one am cheering her on, wishing her great success, for she is definitely glorious!

The successful professionals. Well. That one’s given. Seth Godin. Daily. Definitely showing up with enormous generosity – both in the blogging, the podcasting, the course materials etc, and also live. I attended #SethinLondon in 2015 [Shiiiit, time flies!] and the generosity and warmth that Seth exuded was amazing. Tangible. I was totally star-struck upon meeting Seth in person, and with the most caring down-to-earth:edness, Seth put me right at ease. Very inspiring!

Buuuuut, it’s a bit too easy to point to Seth in The Creative’s Workship, created by Seth himself, isn’t it? However, as I’ve basically stopped reading blogs (once Google shut down their Reader, I really haven’t followed blogs, with one exception, and you know who’s blog that is…) I struggle to come up with another name.

Luckily, I do follow one more person, who blogs, and who is in my view, a successful professional, and who is inspiring also as an entrepreneur, as he’s created the life he wants to live. I am talking about David Stiernholm, known in Swedish as Struktören, which is another make-believe Swedish word (another reason I have a soft spot for him!) which basically means the person structuring things. I have followed David more or less since he started as a Struktör in 2004, and have found an endless amount of resources, ideas and hands-on-tips on structure from him. And if you think that sounds boring? Think again! David shares his knowledge with a sense of humor as well as with great simplicity and pedagogy. I follow him in Swedish, but he does work in English as well and he’s well worth checking out!

The hacks. Hm. Even more of a struggle this one, mostly because I don’t really follow people whom I experience as hacks, in any area. Nah. Nothing and no-one, comes to mind. Nada. Zilch. I’ll sit with this one though, and if I come to think of someone, I’ll revisit this prompt!

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Dailies on #tankespjärn

February 10, 2020
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The other week, on a whim, I got myself a spot in Seth Godin’s The Creative’s Workshop.

It’s not as if I have plenty of time on my hands… well. That’s a bit of a lie, I do. 24 hours per day to be precise, just like everyone else, but what I meant was that it’s not as if there is a lot of unclaimed time within those allotted daily 24 hours. And it’s not looking better anytime soon…
And it’s not as if I need the challenge to be able to live up to whatever runstreak-challenge there is out there, because I know I excel at that.
And it’s not as if I am struggling with what it is I want to do. I do know. I just don’t do it.

Starting today, the workshop features a dailies challenge, asking me to do this:
Not the private Morning Pages that are an essential part of the day for many creators, but a semi-public daily post to create the habit of shipping.

If you’re a writer, share some writing. If you’re a songwriter, share a lyric. If you’re working on becoming a public speaker, share a video. If you’re working in a different medium, share that here.

Every day. Short is fine. Rough is fine. Every day.

Don’t break your streak.

We are set to start the Dailies today, even though some people in the workshop have already kick-started it a couple of days early.
I didn’t, as I was pondering what it was I wanted to do with my dailies. So this morning, when I awoke, I realized what it is I want to use my 100 dailies for. This:

I will not post my dailies here on the blog. (I think.) This is a one-off. (Possibly. Or not?)
But now you know. Now I know you know. And now I know that I am dedicating time and effort to developing #tankespjärn.

To write about it.
To get clear on what it is, what I want to do with it, how I want to do that, what my timeframe is, who my target audience is, the size of my minimum viable audience, and, most likely, a heck of a lot of other questions that I don’t even know now.

 

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Streaks

August 8, 2019
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Seth Godin celebrates eleven years of daily blogging, quite an impressive daily runstreak I must admit. I am far from his caliber (in this, as well as in most – all? – things) but I am quite good at runstreaks myself. It’s soon seven years since I started my Swedish blog, and 6,5 years since I commenced my habit of daily blogging. Which I have not kept up as diligently as Seth, but still, in seven years I have published 2249 blog posts. 2250 with this one. And as I started my more-or-less daily blogging habit on January 23rd 2013, which is 2389 days ago, I have missed 139 days. In 6,5 years. Corresponds to roughly 5 %, which inversely means I’ve blogged just short of 95% of the days since then.

Cool.

Yet.
That wasn’t the point I aimed for.

Seth writes “Streaks require commitment at first, but then the commitment turns into a practice, and the practice into a habit. Habits are much easier to maintain than commitments.

He is so spot on here.

In another runstreak of mine I have managed to stick to the 100% daily drill – I did my 1817th Seven-morning workout today upon waking up. Monday August 18th 2014 I started, and since, I have not missed a single day. It’s evolved from being a commitment, which definitely along the way turned into a habit. One I do not question. It’s not a matter of IF I should do my morning Seven. I just do it. I have made the decision, and put it in the Decision Box, to use the words of my friend Caspian.

I made a decision on August 18th, 2014, to start (and finish) the Seven-month challenge that Perigee (the app-makers) promotes. Every day, I could have revisited that decision. But I didn’t, because I’d already made it. And needless to say, by the end of those seven months, I just kept going.

If nothing else, committing to a runstreak, honoring it and making it a practice, to be rewarded by it becoming a habit is energy conserving. I spent my energy d o i n g my morning workout, rather than debating with myself whether or not I should do it.

Now.
This might not work for everyone. At least not if the Four Tendencies come close to describing how people respond to inner and outer expectations. Needless to say, I am an Upholder. I do not question for a second that Seth Godin is one as well.

However. I firmly believe everyone can find ways of transforming commitments into habits. What’s your way to enable this type of transformation for you?

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Podcast premiere: Doing Gentle with an Edge

April 8, 2019
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At long last, I got iTunes to accept my RSS feed of Doing Gentle with an Edge.

So. Now it’s here. My pod. My very own podcast. 

I’ve been on a few podcasts, but have never had my own. Until now. So I am so proud that I’ve gotten this far! Because this is me, shipping, to use the Seth Godin-term. Putting it out there for the world to hear. (And yes. It is scary. But this is the second of my brain children I’ve been birthing into the world this month, so hey, I am getting the hang of this. Each time, it gets a bit less scary, but always, always, the feeling of champagne bubbles coursing through my body is there!)

I’ve gotten a lot of help in the process.
A Google+ reader commented on a Doing Gentle blog post sometime in 2016, urging me to record it, because – she said – she just knew it would come across differently when read aloud, the beauty and rhythm of my texts.
Søren Lassen Andreasen has helped me record, edit and produce the episodes – and boy has he been patient with my nit-picking to get everything sounding as good as possible.
Olof Jennfors has written the pod soundtrack.
Anders Roos took the picture of me, that I’m using as the pod artwork at the moment.

I’ve described the show thus:
Learning how to do gentle towards yourself can be, for you, the key to loving living life. At least, that’s what doing gentle did to me, Helena Roth, once I understood that it was actually an option.

Imagine having turned 30+ before ever realizing it’s possible to be gentle with myself. From that moment in time, I’ve re-learned how to be in the world – both inside and outside of myself. Here I will be sharing the tools and tricks I’ve picked up along the way, hoping it will help you transform from a victim of the epidemic of harshness into a proud practitioner of doing gentle.

Will you listen?
(Please. Listen.
Let me know what you think, what you like/dislike.
Share it if you think it’s worth sharing, or I am worth supporting.)


Find Doing Gentle with an Edge in a podplayer near you, or via these links:
iTunes https://apple.co/2uSd94d
Spotify https://spoti.fi/2G2XMuI 
Acast https://play.acast.com/s/doinggentlewithanedge?

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Have you thanked God for this failure already?

April 3, 2019
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Podclub coming up. Making/Creating is the theme.
Seth Godin, Milton Glaser, and then… not a pod at all, but a short clip on YouTube of Arvo Pärt giving a commencement speech. Sitting on the bus early in the morning, I press play, and then…

Have you thanked God for this failure already?

God bumps and tears in my eyes.
Absolutely captivated.

The most sensitive musical instrument is the human soul. The next is the human voice.
One must purify the soul until it begins to sound. 

Ah.
These words.
But more than that… the way he says it…
Riveted, I shiver, from the power, the passion, the heartfelt and intense sincerity.

God knits man in his mother’s womb, slowly and wisely.
Art should be born in a similar way.

The video ends and my bus reaches its final destination.
I gather my things, wrap my coat around me and step – newborn – off the bus. Onto the ground.

Feeling vulnerable.
Naked.

Hello world. Please.
Be gentle. Embrace me. Gently.
That’s what I need. Want.

The criterion must be, everywhere and only, humility.

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