victim

Attention energizes. Intention transforms.

Attention energizes. Intention transforms.

June 1, 2020
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Attention energizes.
Intention transforms.

Two phrases I pick up on, every time I hear them. Which I’ve done a few times lately, in the voice of Deepak Chopra from a few of the meditations that are part of his 21 day abundance-challenge.

When I hear them, I am jolted out of my lull.
There’s something to these words –this combination of words– that wakes me up, makes me alert.

At first, I put attention energizes into a negative category, linking attention to what I call drama. When someone does or says something, or omits to do or say something, and how these actions/non-actions can be nitpicked and studied, broken down into their very smallest pieces, and judged.
Right. Wrong. Who’s the victim? Who’s the perpetrator?

And, falling into the normal pattern of polarizing, if attention energizes is negative, then intention transforms would automatically fall into a positive category, right?

Well.
Let’s just say, that today upon waking, after both conversations and internal reflections upon current affairs throughout the weekend, I realized how off my categorization is.

Neither phrase is negative nor positive.
They just are.

Attention energizes.
Intention transforms.

This is information.
It’s not advice on what to do or not to do, but input to be put to use, when and where it serves me, you, us, the greater good.

Attention energizes.
Intention transforms.

What if (more) attention was given, with a clear intention at its core, as the driver? What might shift then? Individually as well as collectively?


#tankespjärn, for those who wish to discover. More. Other. New.
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Difference is a teacher

October 27, 2018
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in Tip
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I want my story heard, because, ironically, I believe Picasso was right. I believe we could paint a better world, if we learned how to see it from all perspectives, as many perspectives as we possibly could. Because diversity is strength, difference is a teacher. Fear difference; you learn nothing. – Hanna Gadsby

A dear friend of mine posted a summons on Facebook to watch Nanette, by Hannah Gadsby, telling me and his other friends, to “Watch it. Thank me later.”

I watched it a few months ago, at the suggestion of my ex-husband. I watched it then, and was astonished. Nanette is sensationally good, and Hannah Gadsby nails it, over and over and over again. But as I sat down in my sofa, wrapped in woolen blankets, with a cup of hot tea with honey, trying to scare away a headcold that’s been creeping up on me, reading Caspians summons, I figured, why not watch Nanette again?

So I did.
Just as astonished. Bowled over. Nailed. Over and over and over.
There is simply no hiding from her, from her justified anger, from her story.

I am angry, and I believe I’ve got every right to be angry. But what I don’t have a right to do, is to spread anger. I don’t. Because anger, much like laughter can connect a room full of strangers, like nothing else. But anger, even if it is connected to laughter, will not relieve tension, because anger is a tension. It is a toxic, infectious tension, and it knows no other purpose than to spread blind hatred, and I want no part of it because I take my freedom of speech as a responsibility. And just because I can position myself as a victim does not make my anger constructive. It never is constructive.

Laughter is not our medicine. Stories hold our cure. Laughter is just the honey that sweetens the bitter medicine. – Hannah Gadsby

To finish off, I’ll simply quote Caspian:
Watch it. Thank me later.

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Resistance.

August 22, 2017
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“There’s a secret that real writers know that wannabe writer’s don’t, and the secret is this: It’s not the writing part that’s hard. What’s hard is sitting down to write. What keeps us from sitting down is Resistance.” 

The WAR of ARTSteven Pressfield writes this in one of the first pages of the book The War of Art. And I can give you a hint, writer is replaceable with whatever you aspire to. Regardless if you want to be a writer, a musician, an artist, an athlete, or whatever you can dream of, what you need to get to is the doing part. If you don’t “sit down to write”, you won’t be a writer. If you don’t practice the guitar, you won’t be a guitarist. If you don’t paint, you won’t be an artist.

The entire book centers on Resistance, and there are quite a few passages that I really enjoy. Some provoke me, other tickle me, other again make me nod emphatically with personal recognition. Here’s another personal favorite:

“Casting yourself as a victim is the antithesis of doing your work. Don’t do it. If you’re doing it, stop.” 

I am way too familiar with Resistance. It’s like an acquaintance that’s overstayed his welcome – boy, would I love to get rid of it! And I think there’s actually a way to at least reduce the frequency when this acquaintance comes a’knocking: by sitting down to write, step by step I train myself to do the work, regardless of the Resistance I feel or not. In time, Resistance might knock more seldom, knowing it’s futile?

Inspired to continue blogging on the theme from the #blogg100-challenge in 2017 I give you:
The book ”The WAR of ART” by Steven Pressfield.

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